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to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws to their acts of pretended legislation. of course the constitution in 1776 was the british constitution. but that concept is the same. there were some foreign jurisdiction is going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices that those who in our time has combined with others to subject us or tend to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. so let's examine the global governance project. these ideas are not hard to find. you don't have to be invited to seek rebuilder broker conspiracy meeting, any of this out. it's right out in the open on the website, and so u.n., european union, american bar association, dean said most law schools at american universities, all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government. this form of transnational government. so let's look at for people, just some quick views of players who have given a taste of the concept global governance
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
the federal law they're much more common in the state's that don't do much of the gun shows and in the state's generating some publicity i heard that open air market that i've shown you pictures of have basically closed with the promoter saying you can't sell guns there so i went back and this time shooting the video from the united corps but indeed they have absolutely no gun sales but everybody has congregated about 150 feet up against the building. he was relocated about a 32nd flock. the other thing that happened, and jamie was kind enough to mention they were kind of winding down the office in the city of new york sent a team of private detectives out and we talked to cameras and we talked on how to try to avoid detection and talked about some gun shows we might want to go to. i had one guy walking around with a camera and these guys were pros. the allies and the years of engagement that said you can't talk to anybody but they were not so hampered and the shot a video and i'm going to show it to you. >> i'm going to let this speak for itself. >> i need to see your id. >> no background c
rights trumped, this new criminal law. and unfortunately, they prevailed. now, i don't think congress when it passed the federal communications decency act meant to allow companies to with kind of knowing disregard for the effects of their practices to enable this. but this is the challenge we face still and that we're preempted from the field. so we're going to try to go back again and work on this. backpage.com makes millions of dollars a year off of this practice. it's one of their primary practices s escort advertising, and they refuse to stop it. other online advertising companies that have this practice don't have the same problem. that's what my police department reports to me. the next step we're taking in seattle is we're going to have a conference of mayors up and down the i-5 corridor because what we know is these young women are brought from town to town. seattle police department studied this, and they tracked one phone number, all right, that was being advertised. and, again, we don't know whether it was underage or not, but neither does back page. and of course it was i
inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
such great pride in the rule of law to have someone come to grips with the place of guns and violence. before we begin this discussioncomes out to you on personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, as in denver colorado on personal business and i was driving to the denver suburbs and i passed into oruro, colorado and saw the sign that to myself, as journalists often do, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago and a young man now appears to be utterly deranged, went to the theater and began shooting people with an assault weapon. and it went away. it is not part of a presidential debate, not part of the daily journalistic diet. so that wednesday night, i e-mailed the reduced their of the "meet the press" show coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we've been through oruro, the sikh temple, the shopping mall. think about this. this is before we got to sandy hook in it. we had a time of absolute carnage in america t
about is that stuff comes up from underground. new laws in colorado, pennsylvania, and ohio which release information about the hydraulic fracturing chemicals say notwithstanding any of the above. we don't have to tell you reactions, anything we bring up from underground. that's dumb. that's just adding to the secrecy, adds to the fears, adds to the concerns, and i'm not saying there are no toxicology effects in the gulf, but reviewing it with my colleagues and reviewed all previous gulf things and snitted -- submitted to the new england journal of medicine, the reviewers were concerned that we were not saying enough about how many people would get leukemia from benzine from the spill, and the answer is probably nobody, but the psychosocial effects are reel. we have to work on communicating with the public. >> just a leadership observation, in the events i've been involved in, i've always tried to use the standard of transparency as the way to deal honestly and forthrightly with the public. the problem is that if you inadd veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you ar
to creating pro-growth tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world we need a level playing field. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world. also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. the 113th congress we are going to continue to advocate for comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base that reduces corporate tax rates and moves through a competitive territorial system. proctor and gamble pays income taxes and over 100 countries around the world. a business tax reform should provide a level playing field so that each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of income tax as its competitors in markets with at home and abroad. in terms of deficit reduction, the obvious problem that must be addressed is the problem that currently the united states has been spending at a rate that far exceeds the rate of revenue that we are receiving. the
to jump in. >> i have problems having spent 30 years in law enforcement. i do have a problem with that and i think i was discussed in mexico in the last session of congress and it didn't really get anywhere. i think they know what the consequences are but the drug abuse. it seemed to me, decriminalizing drugs, [inaudible] that's my personal opinion. >> the information i've seen, although you hear these arguments about decriminalizing, on the other hand these to more and more different drugs and i think -- is not the right direction we would like to take. >> i think mexico does not have the infrastructure to deal with the jocks. in order for that to happen, you would have medical attention and infrastructure that needs to deal with the people addicted to drugs and the effects that create. i think, from my cave, my very own dave to deal not a clear socially was such a big step. there are some who believe and it may believe that what create -- it would stop the violence. i don't think you will do it. not from my death. the country has the backdrop to do with addictions. >> next
are, how do we go about as writers, political figures, judges, law professors, how do we translate the principles of the 18th century in the world of the 21st century? they talk about free speech. they attacked the separation of powers, we have the administrative state. we talk about this is an ongoing process, but given how different the world is, how do we translate the wonderful historically impressive event and say the 18th century to the different world of the 21st century? >> guest: it's not easy. one of the things i object to with so much of the propaganda that i was responding to was that it made you sound very easy. clearly we need to do this. we need to go back to what the founders intended, which is problematic on a whole lot of different levels. i think we'll make a lot of mistakes if we try to go back to the constitution and the demise of the people who wrote it because i don't believe they set down intending to create a checklist of things we need to do. i think they created a political process that is still a very dynamic process and when i've lectured about the book
hundreds of ordinances and state laws. most of which were unconstitutional. and he didn't know what to do. johnson dearly did not want to send troops, united states army troops, into alabama. his fear was that this would precipitate really a second period of reconstruction. just as the marchers were getting ready to head out in defiance of a court or order, wh hundreds of deputies and troopers waiting for them. fruition came to a very subtle problematic plan that johnson had been working on all night, and king had been listening to all night. johnson said, former -- johnson sent former governor, rely collins, who had taken the job to run the federal con sillation service, on a plane at 2:00 in the morning. he was picked up by assistant attorney general john dore, and was driven to the place where king was staying. king came out of the bedroom wearing a robe and two officials gave him a plan. and lyndon johnson had participated in thinking it up. they said, reverend king, we not only have been talking to you, we've been talking to governor wallace, and he doesn't want anymore bloodshed, an
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
mistake if somehow there's ambiguity in this law that would put the federal taxpayer on the hook for decades to come. i hope it's a drafting error, but i would hope that i would have the committee's support for mr. cam intel my amendment to clarify we're not having a long-term liability. second, it's important -- i would note, this amendment is supported by environmental groups. it's supported by the professionals who work in the field. it's supported by taxpayer groups. the second amendment with representative capps, actually two amendments because it applies to both the amendments. to make sure where it says the use of the funds will address long-term recovery, the amendment clarifies that long-term recovery includes mitigation of future events. if we're going to spend billions, we ought to make sure that at the same time we are strengthening the communities to make future loss less affected. it sounds like a minor detail. it doesn't cost us any money to clarify but makes it more likely that we will be not before you in the future, because opportunities to spend this money, to
, individual state laws do not effect whether or not this activity was reasonable under the constitution. >> but we have always, and correct me if i'm wrong, i think that we have always thought of fourth amendment reasonableness standards as being a national standard. suppose 40 states, you know, we can play the game, suppose 40 states had rules, had warrants and many of them had expedited procedures. that's still irrelevant? we don't look at that at a all? >> your honor, i think this court's decision in sampson v. california is instruct i. in that particular case the court approves suspicionless searches, and i think a vast majority of states disapproved of that particular law enforcement practice. but that does not bear on the issue of whether or not that violates the fourth amendment. >> of course, we don't know why they disapproved, and i guess your point is they may well have not permitted it because they were under what you would call the mistaken belief that it was unconstitutional? >> i suppose that is, that is a possibility, justice scalia. >> any issue in the conviction rates i
growing a criminal offense under current -- international law. while coca-cola was guaranteed the right to use it as a flavoring in their own product, indigenous peoples across the andes are told that the traditional practice of coca leaf chilling and drinking tea would no longer be tolerated by the international community, and it is important to point out that the u.s. was the architect of these treaties commensurately have support from other countries. today they have key allies in their effort to maintain the treaties such as russia, japan, sweden. really is a u.s. estimate. so coke go along with cannabis and opium became the main targets of the 1961 convention. this historical error, as i like to college, was basically justified by the 1950 report of the commission of inquiry on the coca leaf which is a totally racist document. it is totally, totally racist. has absolutely no scientific evidence. you can find it on the web now. you will be out raised as you read, it is still the basis for the international drug control conventions treatment of coca. subsequent to that in the 1990's
brothers and i grew up a long time ago, back in a time when certain places in our country had unfair laws that said it was right to keep black people separate because our skin was darker and our ancestors had been captured in far off africa and brought to america as slaves. ok. then we came to -- we come now to atlanta, georgia. the city in which we were growing up had those laws. because of those laws, my family rarely went to picture shows. in fact, to this very day, i don't recall ever seeing my father on a street car because of those laws and the indignity that went with them, daddy preferred keeping m.l., a.d., and me close to home where we would be protected. but we lived in a neighborhood in atlanta now called sweet arbor. and this is the street. you can see the cars. you haven't seen cars like that, have you? they don't have any like that now. ok. something like we used to call a t model ford and so tpot. ok. we lived there on the avenue. and on our side of the street, there were two-story frame houses, similar to the one we lived in. across the street crouched a line of one-story
government in his negotiations at the u.n. to codify the laws against coca. what was happening, was in constant medication with the company primary for the vice president, vice pays, who really got to feel the relationship between them over time. they just had a really interesting parlay between each other. so that's the beginning of an overview of the book. i want to pass the mic back and forth and i think we're going to have questions for each other. but that's the beginning. >> at evening. i'm at the super policies were around the trip policy there. i was once asked to check to a group of high school students in the literature resume and background and came up with the topic and you had to speak to the topic. this being a high school dance, they wanted here but sex, drugs and international relations. at that home-equity type these things together. it didn't dawn on me until the last minute and i realized the way to tell that story was through the story of columbus, who i considered the granddaddy of international drug traffickers. how you see the world depends where you say,
. he's expected to discuss efforts to reduce gun violence and new gun laws proposed by president obama. live coverage starting at 11:30 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on c-span we will show you inaugural speeches from the last 60 years starting at 8 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's address from 1981. though clinton in 1993, president dwight eisenhower in 1957. harry truman, 1949. 1969, richard nixon. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were d
to you, i tell you. what you're claiming is loony, and it defies the laws of logic. i've been sitting here across the table from you forever. i've kept my eyes peeled, and there never has been a pinprick of any kind. what's more, this wacky stuff you call space and time has never existed either. nor will it ever exist. why? because nothing comes from nothing. zero plus zero equals zero. the idea that this basic fact could ever change is ridiculous. and it defies the first law of thermodynamics, the law of conservation of energy, a law so basic that every respectable 31st century -- 21st century scientist will declare it thoroughly right. while i in exasperation am trying to get logic across to you, wham, a pinprick shows its head. it's what sid cysts d physicists will someday call a singularity. i'm stunned. this simply does not make sense. but you stay cool and act as if nothing is happening. meanwhile, that pinprick blows up so fast that it makes me dizzy, and sure enough, it has three properties that have never existed before. three properties that if common sense prevailed should
made it a scandal, grover cleveland best friend and law partner. board in new jersey and spent most of his career in buffalo. became the mayor, governor of new york. a very successful lawyer, and there were law partners. the practice law together, went out together, would go out drinking and eating the other. it appears they also enjoyed the services of maria together. so when she gets pregnant she has a son, and neither knew who the father was. she complicates things by naming the child costar cleveland. oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter. cleveland was a battler, so cleveland kind of accepted responsibility to pay for this child to go for an orphanage. here's where the other part of the scandal comes in. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in the carriage accident. he's driving his carriage and is drawn from it. he leaves a widow and this young girl. cleveland makes an enormous amount of money as his law partner and kind of takes care of the window and the young grow. he pays for them, says the up and i some. his best friend and former law partner. become the godfa
was a graduate of harvard law school, graduated in 1948, worked at major wall street law firm, sherman andsterring and -- sterling and wright, an old and major firm, but he was really bored by corporate law practice. he describes it in his first book which was published in 1968, and it's not really an autobiography, but there's an autobiographical chapter that that's quite interesting. he says, well, there were all these silent victories and muted defeats and these quiet conversations and these, you know, sort of board rooms of our law firm, and he wanted more action than that. and also he loved politics so much, but he really had in some way, shape or form, he had to do it full-time. so he walks away from his law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives just a few blocks south of here, somewhere near the was el belling -- russell building or the dirksen build anything a little apartment. and he joins an important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. robert morris' importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950s was apparently so significant that whitaker
was a graduate of harvard law school, a graduate 1948, worked at a major corporate law firm on old and major firm but he was really bored by the corporate law practice. he described it in his first book published in 1968 and it's not really an autobiography but there are some of the biographical chapters that are quite interesting. he says well, there's all these silent victories and muted defeats in these quiet conversations in these board rooms of the law firm and he wanted more action than that and he also loved politics so much that he had in some way, shape or form he had to do it full time so he walks away from the wall street law firm in early 1956, comes to washington, lives just a few blocks south of here somewhere near the russell building at a little apartment and he joins a very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. his importance in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950's was apparently significant that whitaker chambers said in a letter around that time that morris accomplished more of what joe mccarthy is credited with in terms of useful and constructiv
law enforcement of delware is here, who i've known even longer. we share the same last name. the attorney general, my son beau, and i do whatever he says because he has the power to indo it. -- the power to indict. all kidding aside, i'm proud of my home state, as we used to say in the senate, point of personal privilege, the progress they're making and thefts they're making under the leadership of our governor on the very subject you talked about. and i say to dennis williams, dennis, forgive me if occasionally i'm so used to referring to the mayor of philadelphia as my mayor, because i spend about half my life in philadelphia. and now that my granddaughter resides in the city limits i want to be particularly good. my daughter is also a voter there as well, so i've got to be particularly on good behavior. ladies and gentlemen, it's a pleasure to be back. i look forward to this opportunity every chance i get, from the time i was a young fella, new to the united states senate. it's one of the groups with whom i've had a relationship for a long, long time and always nice to be
. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compliment you, i did want to -- i think to the vice admiral to get up to speed on some of the issues some of the biggest improvements for the kind of career tracking that i think you'll have the lead on in the media and those of us that are -- i was a very brief litigator but prosecutors and other litigators you learn to be a great lawyer by watching the great council, criminal defense working side by side, then having them available to counsel you and for the c-span viewers who may not know why if you could elaborate and explain, as i've been able to understand it there were incentives for those that entered the job corps to be assigned prosecutors but they were to be stationed elsewhere and wasn't quite the rewards of a
can pass into law here in washington, dc. >> host: you talk about two different platforms in your book. what are those platforms? >> guest: the basic idea is how do we drive abundance by looking at areas where -- that can absorb private capital, where private capital wants to go into, where government has appropriate levers and can drive productivity throughout the entire economy, the two we're focused on are what we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can
an officer. the united states capital police are responsibility in conjunction with law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the natural ceremonies throughout the weekend. first and foremost we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this is tort day. with any event that occurs on the capital complex safety is our number one priority. that said, safety and security for potus, guests etc. is not carried out just by us but by partnership with our law enforcement community that would include but not limited to the metropolitan police, the park police and other entities as well as public safety entities. the partnership that we have established to create a pretty robust multifaceted security plan has been in the works for many months and while i cannot go into details, about those security plans please know that we have trained extensively to address any issues that may come up during the day. thank you. >> thank you, officer i appreciate that and as someone who is in security and communications before heading back to the campaign last year i can tell you dur
was a police officer in the city of wilmington. also the chief law enforcement who've i've known even longer share the same last name. the attorney general and i found when i do whatever he says because he is the power power to indict. [laughter] all kidding aside, i'm proud of my home state has ceased to stay in the senate come a point of personal privilege the progress they make in the leadership of jack markel, our governor on the very subject you talked about. i say dennis, you'll forgive me if occasionally i'm so used to referring to the mayor of philadelphia as my mayor because i spent about half my life in philadelphia and other mccray and other resides in the city limits, went to be particularly good. my daughter is also a very very slow, since that's been particularly good behavior. ladies and gentlemen, it's a pleasure to be back. i look forward to the opportunity every chance i get from the time i was a young fellow new to the united states senate, it's one of the groups from whom i've had a relationship for a long, long time and it's always nice to be with a group of people who y
%, but you have permanently fix the alternative minimum tax, which in the law was going to generate $1.8 trillion over this 10 years. what's bigger? 1.8 trillion or six under 50 billion? i'll tell you, republicans should have been celebrating this as a massive victory, a massive tax cut because, in fact, that's what has occurred here. this is a big tax cut. so i say to you in terms of what has to happen next, i think it's going to require the revenue side of the equation and the spending side of equation to be addressed. let me just conclude by saying this. how do we get out of this in the current circumstance? the president said he's not going to negotiate on the debt limit. republicans say they will not vote for an extension of the debt limit unless they get substantial additional cuts in spending. i think judd is absolutely right. we have another dynamic at work here, and that is the sequestered. $1.2 trillion of across the board spending cuts, having defense, half in nondefense. republicans don't like it, democrats don't like it. that creates an opportunity. there's also the questi
for comprehensive and revenue choke tax reform is a critical and very important to creating progress tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world. we need a level playing field. we don't have a level playing field today. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world and also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. during the 113th congress, we're going to continue to advocate comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base they reduces corporate tax rates in those to a competitive territorial system. procter & gamble pays income taxes in over 100 countries around the world good business taxi firm should provide a level playing field of each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of in contacts that its competitors and markets at home and abroad. and deficit reform, the obvious problem is currently the united states has been spending at a rate t
or not these types of droughts and events have occurred in the past, they have. and as a result, the laws of chance simply tell us that they will happen again spent before we get to the policy question, this kind of goes with what we just addressed here, and margaret, you're a case study, and this is a question from alan. is question is, are you aware of any case studies where particular communities actually did take a proactive approach for drought management, and where it worked and where we could take a case -- take a look at the case study and applied elsewhere? >> well, i guess i would have to go back to historic times, because as i mentioned before i worked with navajo communities and so i know a lot about the way people coped with drought before reservation lands were established. and one of the things that people did was they were more aware of how the ecosystem operated, and would move according to what the current conditions work. they would move their livestock so they were more flexible, and the permitting systems and the types of things we have in place now as far as land tenure and wh
in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address
of a role. the point is that rusher did it. rusher had been -- he was a graduate of harvard law school graduated in 1948. he worked at a major wall street law firm now known as sherman in sterling, and old nature firm but he was really bored by corporate law practice. he described it in his first book which was first published in 1968 and is not really an autobiography but an autobiographical chapter this quite interesting. he says while, there will be silent victories and defeats in these quiet conversations in these boardrooms of our law firm and he wanted more action than that. and he also, he loved left politics so much that he really had in some way shape or form he had to do it full-time. so he walks away from his wall street offer in early 1956, comes to washington with lives just a few blocks south of here, somewhere near the russell or the dirksen building and of little apartment and he joins the very important anti-communist investigator named robert morris. robert morris's and points in the anti-communist investigations of the 1950s was apparently so significant that whittak
to come from the congress. they make the laws. they have created this massive thing called dodd-frank, which we are only part weaker in terms of interpreting and figuring out how to work. and i think it's much more appealing and i believe that the community bankers support will be fully supported on this issue. this is something we have been bird dogging, just to go back to the litter references and i think it's gaining momentum going. but it will not be easy. as i said earlier, is benefiting, lawyers and bureaucrats. john. [inaudible] i am half australian, this is water. yes, sir. >> i'm rubber weisner with public citizen. thank you for leading us on this. i have a two-part question, maybe it's two questions disguised as one. you know better than me barney frank and chris god we say we dealt with too big to fail and they meant it. as you're saying as regulators we really mean it and that's not sufficient to convince either bankers are markets. so i'm curious the part you didn't emphasize, but that drug. that's the plan for government intervention to separate the institution and
of representatives. in 1850 they demanded and they got a new law that compelled northern citizens to join posses that were hunting people accused of being runaway shaves who had allege -- slaves who had allegedly escaped into the free states. most of all, the champions of slavery sought ways to retain the control that they had almost continuously exercised over the federal government since the american revolution. and to prevent, above all, to prevent others from using the federal government in ways that might harm the slave owners' interests. in doing this, by the way, they were greatly aided by a clause of the constitution, the so-called three-fifths clause that gave southern whites much heavier representation in the house of respectives than their own numbers otherwise would have warranted. but southerners also sought to increase their representation in both houses of congress as well as in the electoral congress by steadily increasing the number of slave states in the union. and is -- and so it was during the 1840s that they vociferously demanded and lustily cheered both the annexation of te
fundamental set of values and laws. and, um, before that i couldn't -- at first i'd pinch myself. i just couldn't get over the fact that there was no earlier use, and i used all the databases, and i actually got somebody the legislative reference service at the library of congress to actually back me up on it. can you guys find an earlier example of it? at first there was sort of a deep breath saying, oh, my god, this guy's nuts, but the idea was nobody could find it. then somebody said the founding fathers of harvard university or something, but it was never used as a scripter for the -- descriptor for the people who framed the constitution. it's interesting, also, that it really didn't take off until 1941 when a book was written called "founding fathers." but it was immediately adopted by both sides of the aisle although some of the early uses when you go back and track when it starts being used in the '20s more and more often in replacing the word "framers," it's often used as a negative. the founding fathers never meant for us to have pastel-colored postage stamps, or the founding fa
the onside lavatory. throughout the entire plan, power laws -- [inaudible]. the estimated cost to restore the facility to restore the status is between 250-$300 million. mr. chairman, this is just several in new jersey of those regional authorities, utility authorities, that has been damaged. the estimates of each of the cost to repair each of those facilities is quite high. and i submit it in the record. i'm thankful that my friend, mr. frelinghuysen, has -- [inaudible] as i said to you, madam chair, there's no additional money from the treasury. it gives latitude and longitude as we say in new jersey, to the governors of each of the states that are affected. and i asked that his amendment be accepted as part of this hearing. thank you very much. >> thank you very much, mr. pascrell. >> thank you, madam chair. ranking member slaughter, members of the committee, i want to thank you for allowing me to testify today. i also like to recognize my cosponsors of the amendment then going to speak about, congresswoman. the imminent that we offer is a table. it strikes the language in the other an
's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfast is over except c-span agreed not to use video session at least two hours after the breakfast ends. to help c-span if you're sitting next to a microphone, but close to you and if not, they will come around with a boom microphone. please to the traditional thing and send me a subtle nonthreatening single and i will do my best to call on one and all. we will offer their representative levin the chance to make opening comments and moves
to say thank you to our law enforcement partners represented by the d.c. police department today. he represents, our representative today represents a huge law enforcement presence that will be helping keep us all safe over the next four or five days. with that, matt, do you want to talk about what you guys will be doing? >> thanks, brent. good morning, everybody. my name's matt house, i'm the press secretary for the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies. our purview event is primarily everything that's happening on capitol hill on monday. there's staff involved that's been planning various activities for really about a year now. really, the preparations begin the minute the previous one ends, so our staff and the rules committee in the senate has been hard at work preparing for monday, and i just wanted to talk a little bit very briefly about our theme for monday, and then i'll start of walk through some of the logistical components briefly and then, of course, i'm happy to answer additional questions at the end. the theme for in this year is faith in america's futur
to the convention and he is the law and order candidate. it was the first time it had ever been used as a political motto. there are a couple of things that are in the book that are not american but came from overseas. on that sort of threw me was the first person to use social security was winston churchill. in an essay about modern society. he is the one who created the term social security. some people did really well with this. going through a list of who are the most powerful presidents in terms of language, i think that you have to have roosevelt who is way up there. in 1937 he gives a press conference and he is talking about the supreme court and for some of the decisions of this court, if you ask me, they are iffy. and the next day they talk about the president creating the word effete. the five or six years, anytime they said pardon me but this is iffy. of course, slang gets people in trouble. with the wilson is a great waster. one of the things was what could move on. and he used a lot of campaign type of words. he would come up with these accurate sims, you know and the guardians of the
to process and grow food that is either where the laws are weaker than they can have an easier time dictating policy and increasingly, who's been produced in these countries. if you're talking about organic, it's very difficult to get organic products that are meeting standards. as you can imagine how this is happening in places like china. so what we are advocating and the reason that i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more. it is great for the local foods movement, we have our farm and we love people coming out, but we don't envision that our farm or all of the small farmers market in the area are ever going to be able to really feed the entire population. because you have to be able to distribute these products. the distribution has a stranglehold. so we need to have antitrust laws added to our agenda. and it's beyond the fun things that we all enjoy. we believe there are things even with this dysfunctional congress, we need to jumpstart the conversation about these issues. we live in a system that's supposed to be based on competition. all public policies promote and allow deregula
is that issue that confidentiality is the stuff that's coming up from underground. new laws in colorado, pennsylvania, and ohio which do release information about the hydraulic chemicals, notwithstanding, we don't have to tell you about anything we bring up from underground. that's dumb. that adds to the fears, the secrecy, and the concerns. i'm not saying there's no toxicology effects in the gulf, but reviewing that with my colleagues and previous gulf things and submitted to the new england journal of medicine, the reviewers were concerned we were not saying enough about how many people would get leukemia from ben zen from the spill, but the psychosocial effects are real. we have to work on communicating that with the public. >> i have a leadership observation. in the events i've been involved in, i've always tried to use the standard of transparency as a way to deal honestly and forthrightly with the public. the problem is if you inadd veer tonightly create the impression that you did not knowingly and contemporaneously disclose information, there's a discredit with the public, and s
on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson institute and was a senior fellow, and he's the author of many books, and articles including the bush doctrine, what the president said and what it means, world war for. and why are liberal? which should have been entitled why archie is still liberal? he was a pulitzer prize call at colombia university where
the company knows you don't bowl, you don't cut your own law. it's merely covering the track so is that what it knows doesn't seem so spooky. all right. let me finish with another question. i actually like the way i'm finishing. are there are good things about statistics, scary things about statistics, and then there are places where we're watching unfold right now in real-time. this is some of the most interesting stuff. one of the questions at the end of the book is how can we identify and reward good teachers and schools? my wife is a public school math teacher. so she has has been involved in this realm. we need good schools and we need good teachers in order to have good schools. it follows logically we ought to reward good teachers and good schools and firing bad teachers and closing bad schools. how do we do that? test scores give us an objective measure of student performance, yet we know that some students will do much better on a standardized test for other reasons that have nothing to do with what is going on inside the classroom or the school. the seemingly simple solution is to
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raids the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: looking at the appropriation bills and not done the last two years and say we appropriate x amount of money it is over $350 billion that which is not funded and it tells you there is the imbalance in congress had we appropriate funds we have not said we spend money on? that tells you the power of the benefit going back to what is the most important but is it more important to think what is the health of the country and the long run? to put yourself on the losing side of every argument coming have to work hard to explain yourself. >> members of congress to not have the opportunity to read the bills they vote on. >> one of the most secret and intimate -- ways is to report language only members of the committee can vote or amend. each year congress spends countless hours to debate the budget resolution and has no intention of keeping. number 10, congress circumvents its own budget limits to avoid public scrutiny by exploiting its own budget. >> guest: those
his eyes had been. so this comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham.
pay some poor kenyan for some? so it's been that kind of situation. >> host: you've been to law e, texas, kansas for your research on this and now you are in kenya when does the research part of it in the? >> guest: you just know when you get there. actually the research never ends. there is a point i say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sur
coolidge the law and order candidate. the phrase was rarely used before but it was the first time it was used as a political motto. again there are various people who i have to list is the best. there are couple of things that are in the book that are not american that came from overseas. israili is a real dark horse which is part of the political language and one that threw me a bit was the first person to use social security was winston churchill. in 1906 in an essay about modern society and what has to be done but he is the one who creates the term social security. there are some people that really do well with it. i think if you had a list of who were the most powerful presidents in terms of language i think you have -- frankly roosevelt has to be way up there. not only the phrases are but if he -- iffy he's talking about the supreme court insist some of these decisions of the supreme court if you ask me our iffy. next day the lead of the papers was in fact the president created the word today iffy and for five or six years anytime a columnist in the tribune said pardon me
years ago now, 1913 was the law. not to be monetary policy, but rather to address financial interest. and that's we did of course in 2008-2009. and it's a difficult task, but i think going forward the fed needs to think about financial stability and monetary economic stability, some sense the two key pillars of what the central bank tries to be. so we will obviously be working very hard on financial stability. we would be using our regular supervisory powers, tried to strengthen the financial system, and if necessary we will adjust monetary policy as well but i don't think that is the first line of defense. >> okay. this question comes from twitter. since the fed declared it was targeting a 2% inflation rate january 2012, fomc has released its projections five times but and each one of these projections of the inflation rate has come in below this target. why then has the policy been set consistently to undershoot of the target? >> was about 140 characters? [laughter] >> i suspect many in our audience had related questions. >> that's a very good question. when we have tried -- one wi
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